April 4th, 2007

International Kittens of Mystery

A Kitten's Guide to High Places

This week's kitten's guide looks at dizzy heights and features Kai at his dizziest. Yesterday the full-figured stunt kitten decided that having climbed a giant stack of straw without a Sherpa he should then leap from the mighty summit onto the even mightier roof beams of the barn. One more jump and he reached an opening in the gable wall and from there he found a place to sit and gaze down at the ant-like human's toiling in the garden.

So far so good. Then he decides that a stunt kitten with an audience should put on a show. Instead of descending by retracing his steps he decides to use the Wisteria. Now most kittens learn from an early age that Wisteria fire exits are for use only when there are no other means of egress. Here we see Kai a quarter of the way down the Wisteria and attempting to go round the bend - something he usually excels at.


Note the large degree of wobble. He's fifteen feet off the ground and swinging like a high wire act. By the time I'd grabbed the ladder and ran back with it, he'd gone. Not to a Kai-shaped depression in the ground but back inside the barn. He'd managed to climb up the stonework and crawled under a gap in the eaves.

Here we see Kai about to jump back onto the straw pile.


And here we see Kai discovering that climbing down is never as much fun as climbing up. For some reason distances are doubled. And really high stacks of straw become really really high stacks of straw.


Next week, with Kai checking into the celebrity kitten rehab unit, there will be a Lamb Picture Wednesday.


International Kittens of Mystery

Shift Book Cover - Preliminary Results

This has been an interesting exercise. I posted the two options on Livejournal, Baen's Bar and rasfc. As of now, 7 have gone for option one, 8 for option 2, 4 for a composite and 4 didn't like either.

And there have been some excellent comments. I'll produce a third option over the next few days taking in all the suggestions (and realising that there is no combination of words known to man that will please everyone)